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Profanatica - Rotting Incarnation of God

Profanatica
Rotting Incarnation of God
by Chris Hawkins at 03 December 2019, 7:26 PM

There are few bands out in the Black Metal scene, European or American, that have had the longevity that PROFANATICA has had.  Formed as the result of the splitting of the original lineup of INCANTATION, the band was decidedly Black Metal from the beginning.  Theirs is a legacy of vile disdain for humanity, a campaign to champion the darkness that permeates every facet of this planet we call Earth.  1990, the year the band started, was before the Norse-Mania that took over with the advent of what has come to be known as the Second Wave of Black Metal.  Listening to PROFANATICA is not easy, it requires an open mind receptive to their left-handed battle-cry, one who too enjoys the disharmony and chaos present in the universe.  To put it bluntly, this is not the album to play your new girlfriend when she asks about your music and clothing choices!  Or, maybe it is just the one!

Rotting Incarnation of God” is the band’s fifth full-length album overall.  This may seem like a smaller number than one would expect from an outfit with such a long, storied history, but the fact that many of their releases have been singles or splits must be accounted for.  The sound is true to what fans would expect and though there is a lo-fi vibe to it all, the sound is quite expansive.  Most importantly, there are no special effects or gimmicks.  The live sound provided is one that is both authentic and welcome.

Liturgy of Impurity” kicks things off and the album erupts with an intense barrage of deadly riffs aimed straight for the gut.  This is Black Metal with a healthy crusty feel, one that speaks to the intent of the song’s writer(s) – legitimacy, simply put.  This rumbles with a cavernous onslaught of grimy, perverse, markedly nihilistic, unholy Black Metal.

It is hard to accurately hit the public’s reaction trigger/button these days with song titles and album names, but “Broken Jew,” the title of the third track, paints a glowing target on the band for the likes of ANTIFA.  Regardless of shock value – there is certainly more of that to come – the song causes the listener to feel uneasy and extremely negative.  It is truly misanthropy made for consumption.  The following track, “Washed in the Blood of the Lord,” has a middle part with a slower tempo where a sinister tremolo-picked line is played over a steady, though not necessarily perfectly punctual drum part.

Tithing Cunt,” the seventh track, is an offering that does little to tread outside of the box created but still has its own unique vibe to contribute to the album.  The breakdown in the latter half is just nasty, a simple riff propelled by an audibly gurgling bass that breaks up any hint of monotony.  The title track follows and begins with an extended bass line that is drowning in distortion which moves the song forward.  The tone is simply perfect, the ideal crust-filled low end for everything from EYEHATEGOD to, evidently, PROFANATICA.

Hopefully, it has been made clear that this is not friendly, sing-along, Hot Topic-Black Metal.  No, this is the real deal from one of the innovators and originators of the genre.  While there is no apparent experimentation, the band stands by its hateful ethos with an album that speaks to the disgust and disunity of many members of humanity in modern times.

Songwriting: 7
Originality: 7
Memorability: 8
Production: 7

3 Star Rating

Tracklist:
1. Liturgy of Impurity
2. Prayer in Eclipse
3. Broken Jew
4. Washed in the Blood of the Lord
5. Sacramental Cum
6. Mocked, Scourged, and Shit Upon
7. Tithing Cunt
8. Rotting Incarnation of God
9. Eucharist in Ruin
10. My Kingdom
Lineup:
Paul Ledney – Vocals, Drums
Alex Cox –Bass
Record Label: Season of Mist
     


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